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Monday, March 5, 2012

The Theology of Barack Obama: An Interview From 2004 Resurfaces

A few weeks ago, the folks over at Sojourners republished an old interview they gave with then State-Senator Barack Obama who was running for the office of Senator of Illinois in 2004. It stands as the most detailed interview regarding President Obama's faith and theology. At this time, Obama was not a national figure. It wouldn't be until the 2004 Democratic National Convention that Obama's name recognition sky rocketed following his speech at that event. So what we have here is an interview with the President on matters of faith that he would not dare discuss now.

Cathleeen Falsani: What do you believe?

BARACK OBAMA: I am a Christian. So, I have a deep faith. So, I draw from the Christian faith. On the other hand, I was born in Hawaii where obviously there are a lot of Eastern influences. I lived in Indonesia, the largest Muslim country in the world, between the ages of six and 10. My father was from Kenya, and although he was probably most accurately labeled an agnostic, his father was Muslim. And I’d say, probably, intellectually I’ve drawn as much from Judaism as any other faith.

So, I’m rooted in the Christian tradition. I believe that there are many paths to the same place, and that is a belief that there is a higher power, a belief that we are connected as a people. … [O]ne of the churches that I became involved in was Trinity United Church of Christ. And the pastor there, Jeremiah Wright, became a good friend. So I joined that church and committed myself to Christ in that church.

Falsani: What do you believe?

OBAMA: 
I am a Christian.
So, I have a deep faith. So, I draw from the Christian faith.
On the other hand, I was born in Hawaii where obviously there are a lot of Eastern influences.
I lived in Indonesia, the largest Muslim country in the world, between the ages of six and 10. 
My father was from Kenya, and although he was probably most accurately labeled an agnostic, his father was Muslim.
 And I’d say, probably, intellectually I’ve drawn as much from Judaism as any other faith. . . .

So, I’m rooted in the Christian tradition. I believe that there are many paths to the same place, and that is a belief that there is a higher power, a belief that we are connected as a people. That there are values that transcend race or culture, that move us forward, and there’s an obligation for all of us individually as well as collectively to take responsibility to make those values lived. . . .

Falsani: Do you still attend Trinity?

OBAMA: Yep. Every week. Eleven o’clock service.

Ever been there? Good service. …

Falsani: Who’s Jesus to you?

(He laughs nervously)

OBAMA: Right. Jesus is an historical figure for me, and he’s also a bridge between God and man, in the Christian faith, and one that I think is powerful precisely because he serves as that means of us reaching something higher.

And he’s also a wonderful teacher. I think it’s important for all of us, of whatever faith, to have teachers in the flesh and also teachers in history
. …

Falsani: Do you have people in your life that you look to for guidance?

OBAMA: Well, my pastor is certainly someone who I have an enormous amount of respect for. …

Falsani: 
Jack Ryan [Obama's Republican opponent in the U.S. Senate race at the time] said talking about your faith is fraught with peril for a public figure.

OBAMA:
 Which is why you generally will not see me spending a lot of time talking about it on the stump.

Alongside my own deep personal faith, I am a follower, as well, of our civic religion. I am a big believer in the separation of church and state. I am a big believer in our constitutional structure. I mean, I’m a law professor at the University of Chicago teaching constitutional law. I am a great admirer of our founding charter, and its resolve to prevent theocracies from forming, and its resolve to prevent disruptive strains of fundamentalism from taking root ion this country.

As I said before, in my own public policy, I’m very suspicious of religious certainty expressing itself in politics.

Now, that’s different form a belief that values have to inform our public policy. I think it’s perfectly consistent to say that I want my government to be operating for all faiths and all peoples, including atheists and agnostics, while also insisting that there are values that inform my politics that are appropriate to talk about.

A standard line in my stump speech during this campaign is that my politics are informed by a belief that we’re all connected. That if there’s a child on the South Side of Chicago that can’t read, that makes a difference in my life even if it’s not my own child. If there’s a senior citizen in downstate Illinois that’s struggling to pay for their medicine and having to chose between medicine and the rent, that makes my life poorer even if it’s not my grandparent. And if there’s an Arab American family that’s being rounded up by John Ashcroft without the benefit of due process, that threatens my civil liberties.

I can give religious expression to that. I am my brother’s keeper, I am my sister’s keeper, we are all children of God. Or I can express it in secular terms. But the basic premise remains the same. I think sometimes Democrats have made the mistake of shying away from a conversation about values for fear that they sacrifice the important value of tolerance. And I don’t think those two things are mutually exclusive
. . . .

Falsani: [Do You believe in hell]?

OBAMA:
 I find it hard to believe that my God would consign four-fifths of the world to hell.
I can’t imagine that my God would allow some little Hindu kid in India who never interacts with the Christian faith to somehow burn for all eternity.
That’s just not part of my religious makeup.

Part of the reason I think it’s always difficult for public figures to talk about this is that the nature of politics is that you want to have everybody like you and project the best possible traits onto you. Often times that’s by being as vague as possible, or appealing to the lowest common denominators. The more specific and detailed you are on issues as personal and fundamental as your faith, the more potentially dangerous it is
.

Falsani: 
Do you ever have people who know you’re a Christian question a particular stance you take on an issue, how can you be a Christian and

OBAMA:
 Like the right to choose.
I haven’t been challenged in those direct ways. And to that extent, I give the public a lot of credit. I’m always stuck by how much common sense the American people have. They get confused sometimes, watch Fox News or listen to talk radio. That’s dangerous sometimes. But generally, Americans are tolerant and I think recognize that faith is a personal thing, and they may feel very strongly about an issue like abortion or gay marriage, but if they discuss it with me as an elected official they will discuss it with me in those terms and not, say, as ‘you call yourself a Christian.’ I cannot recall that ever happening. . . .

Falsani: Do you believe in heaven?

OBAMA: Do I believe in the harps and clouds and wings?

Falsani: A place spiritually you go to after you die?

OBAMA:
 What I believe in is that if I live my life as well as I can, that I will be rewarded. I don’t presume to have knowledge of what happens after I die. But I feel very strongly that whether the reward is in the here and now or in the hereafter, the aligning myself to my faith and my values is a good thing.

When I tuck in my daughters at night and I feel like I’ve been a good father to them, and I see in them that I am transferring values that I got from my mother and that they’re kind people and that they’re honest people, and they’re curious people, that’s a little piece of heaven
.

Falsani: Do you believe in sin?

OBAMA: 
Yes.

Falsani: What is sin?

OBAMA:
 Being out of alignment with my values.

Sojourners - Transcript:  Barack Obama and the God Factor Interview
WORLD Magazine (Marvin Olasky) - Obama before he was famous 



For more:
Blogizomai - And Jesus Saith Unto Them, "Tax the Rich Moreth": Obama at the 2012 Prayer Breakfast
Blogizomai - President Obama at the 2011 Easter Prayer Breakfast
Blogizomai - Prayer and Breakfast:  Obama at the 2011 National Prayer Breakfast  
Blogizomai - With Presidents Like These Who Needs God?: "God of All Things" and the Modern Presidency
Blogizomai - Endowed By Who?: Three Strikes and the President is Out
Shortblog - Fool Me Once, Shame on You.  Fool Me Twice . . .:  Obama Omits "Creator" Again
Blogizomai - Is Obama a Muslim?: Are We Asking Oursleves the Wrong Question?
Reviews - "The Audacity of Hope"  
Blogizomai - Prophet, Priest, and President:  Is Obama the Messiah? 
Blogizomai - Politics is Thicker Than Promises:  Lessons Learned From Obama and the Gay Community
Blogizomai - It Ain't Easy Being the Messiah:  Is Reality Finally Hitting America About the Messianism of Politcians 
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