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Saturday, September 15, 2012

All Around the Web: Links For Your Weekend - September 15, 2012

I have been blogging through Millard Erickson's systematic theology called Christian Theology and just finished the third section on Theology Proper. Here are all of the links:

Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 1 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 2 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 3
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 4  
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 5

Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 1
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 2 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 3
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 4
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 5
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 6
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 7
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 8  
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 9
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 10

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 3 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 5 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 6
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 7
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 8
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 10
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 11
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 12
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 13
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 14
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 15
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 16
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 17
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 18
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 19
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 20 


Christianity Today - Pornography 'setting moral standard' for young people |

Young people are growing to expect sex on demand and without consequences, a Wheaton professor has warned

William Struthers, Associate Professor of Psychology at Wheaton College, believes that pornography is reinforcing unrealistic and unhealthy views of sex among young people.

“Pornography is a violation of the childhood mind, creating expectations that anybody and everybody is willing to engage in sex on demand and that consent will always be freely given,” he said.

"Pornography is setting a moral standard for young people. They watch other people doing things and put themselves in their place.

"Internet pornography demonstrates the act but never the consequences. There are a variety of potential consequences that are never explored such as sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, and the impact of sexual exploitation.

"Without the opportunity to have what they have seen processed and explained to them, their expectations about what is appropriate and what is not goes unchallenged. Without input from a mature adult, sex is understood as a recreational commodity
.”


Washington Post - Evangelicals seek a future for thousands of frozen embryos | I wrote about this in my ebook on the culture of death. It is time for Christians to adopt the born and the frozen.

The embryo was frozen in liquid nitrogen when Gabriel and Callie Fluhrer found it. They didn’t know whether that embryo would grow to be a boy or a girl, or whether it would even grow at all.

But to the Fluhrers, it was worth the risk. That tiny collection of cells was a baby, they believed. And if they didn’t pluck it from the warehouse where it had been stored since its biological parents decided they didn’t need or want it any longer, it was likely to die.

“If we’re going to stand against abortion, it’s not simply picketing a clinic,” said Gabriel Fluhrer, a public relations and publishing coordinator for the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals. “It’s doing the hard work of adopting the orphans around the world, whether embryos or orphans living in China.”

Anna Fluhrer was born in December 2010: from a frozen embryo to a healthy baby girl.

Hundreds of thousands of embryos are stored in high-tech storage facilities across the United States. To an increasing number evangelical Christians, that’s hundreds of thousands of babies.


James K. A. Smith (The Resurgence) - Grace As Big as Creation | This is a great article on the bigger picture of Calvinism. Smith has made the point elsewhere that Calvinism is not just soteriology (salvation), but is much bigger than that. I encourage you to read the whole article.

What first captivated me about Calvinism was its soteriology, or doctrine of salvation. Calvinism offered a robust, biblical, and historic account of personal salvation, helping me to make sense of all those biblical passages about sin, grace, election, and predestination. Not only did this make sense of the Scriptures for me, it also had an existential resonance. It accounted for that deep sense that I had been found, not that I had found what I was looking for. . . .

For what I realized was that the Reformed tradition wasn’t just a soteriology. In fact, the Reformed tradition’s understanding of salvation was bound up with a doctrine of creation. Indeed, this was part of the polemic with Rome at the time. While Catholicism seemed to teach that salvation was “super”-natural, that grace was a supplemental addition that “completed” creation, Reformers like John Calvin and his heirs emphasized that salvation was the restoration of creation—that grace restores nature. This is why the vision of the New Jerusalem is not just some science-fiction fantasy of an unimagined world. It explicitly hearkens back to the Garden of Eden. Salvation is not sheer reinvention; it is renewal.


Washington Post - Surprised by teens who order prostitutes as easily as pizza? You shouldn’t be. | A new world we live in. Parents need to wake up. Churches need to wake up.

No parent should be shocked that five high school football players hired prostitutes while on a road trip to North Carolina last week.

Nor is it especially surprising that the little johns were from football powerhouse DeMatha Catholic High School in Hyattsville. Religion and prestige are rarely shields from temptation and stupidity.

What’s new in this old-as-time story is that today, thanks to smartphones and the nearly complete submersion of the sex trade into the digital swamp, ordering three prostitutes to your hotel room is as easy as ordering a pizza.

This teen boy fantasy is closer to “Weird Science” than “Risky Business.”
 
“The Internet is the new street corner, and I tell everyone that going down to 14th Street” — the street once known for prostitution in the District — “is nothing more than going to your browser now,” said Sgt. Ken Penrod, a vice detective with the Montgomery County police.


First Things - Campaign 2012: The Future of the Pro-Life Cause | Here is another reason why this election matters. Several Supreme Court Justices could retire in the next 4-8 years thus shaping the future of the court for a generation.

“It’s the economy, stupid!”—James Carville’s memorable note-to-self during the 1992 presidential race—will be the determining factor in the 2012 campaign, according to the common wisdom. That may be true. But as Catholics consider their responsibilities between now and November 6, it would be good to remember that the future of the pro-life cause in America is also at stake.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 79. Justices Antonin Scalia and Anthony Kennedy are 76. Justice Stephen Breyer is 74. The president elected in November will likely appoint two Supreme Court justices, and may appoint as many as four, over the next quadrennium. If that next president replaces Justices Ginsburg, Breyer, and Kennedy with nominees who think that Roe v. Wade (1973) and Casey v. Planned Parenthood (1992) were wrongly decided, there could conceivably be a 7-2 Court majority to overturn (or, in effect, gut) those dreadful decisions and return the abortion debate (and related life-issues questions like euthanasia) to the states. There, the pro-life cause would win some states (likely the majority) and lose some others. With national opinion polls showing a pro-life majority for the first time in a long time, however, the conditions would be right for legally advancing the cause in a dramatic way.

If, conversely, Justice Scalia (and Justices Ginsburg and Breyer, and possibly Kennedy) were to be replaced in the next presidential term by nominees favorable to the Court’s judgment in Roe and Casey, the radical abortion license created by those two decisions might well be set in federal legal concrete for the next thirty years. The pro-life cause would go on, but it would continue under severe federal legal constraints
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Breitbart - iPhone 5 Revealed; 'World's Thinnest Smartphone' |




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