Friday, May 31, 2013

A Must Read: Told You So

John Stonestreet on how we are quickly sliding down the sexual slippery slope:

On Valentines’s Day, the Scientific American published an article claiming that polyamorists could “teach us a thing or two about love,” and the only reason to oppose it was bigotry because of outdated views about love and sexuality. As I said on my Point commentary about the article, the flow of the argument sounded far too familiar.

And now, as if on cue, Slate magazine published an article on April 15 by Jillian Keenan arguing that polygamy should be legalized. As Keenan notes, the arguments about gay marriage being a “slippery slope” that will lead to legalized polygamy is something “we’ve been hearing about for years.” To which she adds, “We can only hope.”

She continues: “While the Supreme Court and the rest of us are all focused on the human right of marriage equality, let’s not forget that the fight doesn’t end with same-sex marriage. We need to legalize polygamy, too. Legalized polygamy in the United States is the constitutional, feminist, and sex-positive choice.”

Keenan adds that legalizing polygamy would help to “protect, empower, and strengthen women, children, and families.” How? By ending the “isolation” where “crime and abuse can flourish unimpeded.” That is, if polygamy is legal, she says, victims of abuse would be more likely to report abuses to the authorities.

Finally, she argues that respect for religious freedom requires legalizing polygamy. It isn’t only fundamentalist Mormons she’s concerned about: she cites “academics” who “suggest” that there may be between 50 and 100,000 Muslims in the U.S. who practice polygamy.

This argument is simply foolish. Jonestreet goes on to write:

What’s most significant here isn’t the quality of Keenan’s arguments. The quality is poor. The treatment of women in countries where polygamy is legal makes her optimism about the impact of legalizing it seem dangerously naive. And her appeal to religious freedom is—shall we say—selective. There are plenty of law-abiding Americans whose religious freedom is under genuine threat who could benefit from this kind of solicitude.

No, the most significant thing about Keenan’s argument is not, to paraphrase Samuel Johnson, that it’s made well, but that it’s made openly.

Read the rest here.

All Around the Web - May 31, 2013


John Stonestreet - Materialism vs. Reality |

C. S. Lewis observed that the most dangerous ideas in a society are not the ones argued, but the ones assumed. And there’s little doubt that in most universities across the United States, secularist materialism, in one form or another, is the assumed and unquestioned perspective from which most subjects are understood and taught.

So much so, that even professors theoretically committed to open-mindedness and inquiry are like the proverbial fish who don’t know they’re wet. And if they can’t recognize their own materialist limitations, then neither do the students they indoctrinate.

Let me be clear. The real problem with secularist materialism is not that it is now largely assumed and unquestioned. And it’s not even that materialist explanations are never right, because they are at times.

Rather, the problem is that as a worldview, materialism is so severely limited. You see, the “rules” of secularist materialism are that nothing other than purely physical causes or processes can be considered when looking at any area of life. Self-deluded as “neutral and scientific,” materialism disallows up front any metaphysical, spiritual, or supernatural considerations at all.


The Gospel Coalition - Parents, Do You Think Before You Post? |

Most discussions of children and online protocol center on privacy settings and password safety for school-age children, but my concern starts earlier. Are we parents protecting and preserving the future privacy wishes and best interests of our small children in our own online posting choices?
Every day parents use social media and the blogosphere to offer up photos and posts chronicling all manner of child misbehavior, parental frustrations, and mishaps involving bodily fluids. I think these posts are made by well-meaning parents, unaware that they are creating an online identity for their children. But with every post, we construct a digital history of our child's life—a virtual scrapbook for public viewing—and we might want to think harder about the trail we are leaving behind. Do our comments and photos preserve our child's dignity or gratify our own adult sense of comedy? Do we post our thoughts to satisfy a need to vent? Do we miss the truth that our families need our discretion far more than our blog followers need our authenticity?

There is a reason we don't vent about or post potentially embarrassing pictures of our spouse or our mother-in-law: the real possibility that they will see what we have posted. No such danger exists with a young child . . . or does it? Cyberspace feels fleeting and forgiving, but it is neither. Consider that your toddlers will likely one day see the online identity you have created for them. And so may their middle school peers, their prom date, their college admissions board, and their future employers. But far more important than what the outside world will think of this digital trail is what your child will think of it.


Joe Carter - Study: Christians Who Tithe Have Healthier Finances |

Some of the more interesting findings from the study include:

• 77% of those who "tithe" give 11%-20% or more of their income, far more than the baseline of 10%.
• 97% make it a priority to give to their local church.
• 70% "tithe" based on their gross income, not their net.
• 63% started giving 10% or more between childhood and their twenties
• Tithers carry much less debt than most people and are financially better off than Christian non-tithers—80% of "tithers" have no unpaid credit card bills; 74% have no car payments; 48% own their home; and 28% are completely debt-free.
• What keeps non-tithing Christians from giving: 38% say they can't afford it; 33% say they have too much debt; and 18% said their spouse does not agree about tithing.


First Thoughts - Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor, but Not Your Homeschoolers | The title is great don't you agree?

The Romeike family, about whose case I previously posted, has lost its latest round in the federal courts. In a unanimous ruling, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals sided with the Obama Administration’s contention that the Romeikes are not victims of persecution.

The question is not whether Germany’s policy violates the American Constitution, whether it violates the parameters of an international treaty or whether Germany’s law is a good idea. It is whether the Romeikes have established the prerequisites of an asylum claim—a well-founded fear of persecution on account of a protected ground.
The Romeikes have not met this burden. The German law does not on its face single out any protected group, and the Romeikes have not provided sufficient evidence to show that the law’s application turns on prohibited classifications or animus based on any prohibited ground.
The family will in all likelihood appeal this decision, asking first of all for an en banc rehearing before the entire Sixth Circuit and then for their day in court before the Supreme Court. I do not have high hopes for them.


Reuters - Court rules bin Laden death photos can stay secret |


A federal appeals court ruled on Tuesday that the U.S. government had properly classified top secret more than 50 images of al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden taken after his death, and that the government did not need to release them.

The unanimous ruling by three judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit rejected a request for the images by a conservative nonprofit watchdog group.

Judicial Watch sued for photographs and video from the May 2011 raid in which U.S. special forces killed bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, after more than a decade of searching.

The organization's lawsuit relied on the Freedom of Information Act, a 1966 law that guarantees public access to some government documents.








HT: Thabiti

Thursday, May 30, 2013

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 6

Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 1 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 2 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 3
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 4  
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 5

Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 1
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 2 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 3
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 4
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 5
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 6
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 7
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 8  
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 9
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 10

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 3 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 5 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 6
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 7
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 8
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 10
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 11
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 12
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 13
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 14
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 15
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 16
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 17
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 18
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 19
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 20

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 3
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 5 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 6
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 7
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 8
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 9
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 10
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 11
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 12
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 13
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 14
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 15
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 16

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 3
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 5 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 6

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 3
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 5
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 6
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 7
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 8
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 9

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 3
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 5
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 6 


Leaving the doctrine of Christ's deity, we now move to the doctrine of Christ's humanity. In his book Christian Theology, Dr. Millard Erickson begins by explains why the humanity of Jesus is so important.

The importance of Jesus' humanity cannot be overestimated, for the issue in the incarnation is soteriological . . . The human problem is the gap between us and God. the gap is, to be sure, ontological. God is far superior to humans, so much so that he cannot be known by unaided human reason. If he is to be known, God must take some initiative to make himself known to humanity. But the problem is not merely ontological. There also is a spiritual and moral gap between the two, a gap created by humans' sin. Humans cannot by their own moral effort counter their sin in order to elevate themselves to the level of God. if there is to be fellowship between the two, they have to be united in some other way. This, it is traditionally understood, has been accomplished by the incarnation, in which deity and humanity were united in one person. If, however, Jesus was not really one of us, humanity has not been united with deity and we cannot be saved. For the validity of the work accomplished in Christ's death, or at least its applicability to us as human beings, depends upon the reality of his humanity, just as its efficacy depends upon the genuineness of his deity.

Furthermore, Jesus' intercessory ministry depends upon his humanity. If he was truly one of us, experiencing all of the human temptations and trials, then he is able to understand and empathize with us in our struggles as humans. On the other hand, if he was not human, or only incompletely human, he cannot really intercede as a priest must on behalf of those who he represents. (722-723)

This is a good summary of the importance and practical side of this doctrine. The doctrine of Christ as mediator presumes that He is both fully God and fully man. Deny either of those is to unravel the biblical presentation of redemption. Furthermore, what sets Christianity apart from every religion is the powerful truth that instead of us ascending to God (as religion teaches) God has descended to become one of us. He walked in our shoes. Overcame our temptations. And gained victory over Satan, sin, the world, the flesh, and the Law, as our righteous substitute. The man, Jesus Christ, who is God did that.


For more:
John Knox on the Threefold Office of Christ
John Knox on the Importance of the Ascension
The God Who Became Man: Millard Erickson on the Implications of the Humanity of Christ 
Alumni Academy Christology Lectures From Dr. Bruce Ware
"The Jesus We Missed" by Patrick Henry Reardon 

All Around the Web - May 30, 2013

Albert Mohler - Sneering at Parents, Hiding Behind “Science” — The Emergency Contraception Controversy |

Looking for evidence that our society is losing its mind? Just look at the controversy over so-called “emergency contraceptives” and a federal judge’s effort to make these drugs available, over the counter, to girls of any age.

Last month, Judge Edward Korman of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York handed down an order forcing the Food and Drug Administration to make emergency contraceptives, sometimes called the “morning-after pill,” available without a doctor’s prescription or parental permission to girls without any restriction on age.

Judge Korman’s order would open the door for girls as young as 10 or 11 to obtain the morning-after pill without any involvement by either a doctor or a parent. That same girl, of course, could not be given an aspirin in a school clinic without parental permission, much less a simple antibiotic like penicillin. Nevertheless, this federal judge ruled that girls and women of any age must be allowed over-the-counter access to emergency contraceptives.

Christianity Today - VIDEO: Rob Bell and Andrew Wilson discuss homosexuality | Rob Bell has either aged or had a terrible make over.




Chuck Colson - He is Ascended? So What? |

First, Jesus' exaltation to God's right hand brings the gospel story full circle.

Second, Jesus' exaltation to God's right hand means that gospel preaching proclaims a royal reality, not strictly a system of salvation's mechanics.

Third, we share in Jesus' exaltation to God's right hand where we experience the riches of God's grace.


The Hobbit Blog - New Zealand, Home of Middle-earth |




Tim Challies - The History of Christianity in 25 Objects: The Gutenberg Bible |

The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas in Austin contains a copy of what many people consider the most valuable book in the world. The Gutenberg Bible is not only the oldest surviving book to be printed using moveable type, but also the first complete book to be produced with that technology. The volume in the University of Texas is one of only 20 complete copies to survive. Though its value is merely speculative as it has been almost 40 years since a copy was last sold, there is no doubt that if it were put on the market today, it would shatter all existing records. (The edition at the Harry Ransom Center was purchased in 1978 for $2,400,000.) As we survey the history of Christianity in 25 historical objects, Gutenberg’s Bible represents his great contribution to history in the movable type printing press.


Tim Lahaye and Jerry B. Jenkins' book "The Mark" from the Left Behind series makes a very brief cameo in The Amazing Spiderman movie.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Hump Day Humor: Unreal Beauty Sketches

The following video will only make sense if you've seen the original Dove video.

Mark Driscoll and Five Ways Jesus Loves the Church

From Mark Driscoll's book Who Do You Think You Are: Finding Your Identity In Christ:
  1. As head, Jesus took the sin that was our fault and made it his responsibility. By dying in our place for our sins, Jesus took our punishment. Practically, this mans that God will never punish those who are in Christ. To be sure, we will reap the consequences of our sin in this life, and like any loving Father, God may discipline us for our good and growth, but never for retribution. the price for our sin was paid once and for all by Jesus because as our leader and head, he has made us his responsibility and loved us unconditionally.
  2. As savior, Jesus delivers us from the horrendous fates that our sin causes. Sin brings death in every conceivable way. Health, joy, friendships,families, and fruitfulness all die because of sin, and one day we will physically die because of sin. As savior, Jesus delivers us from countless miseries and tragedies that our sin would cause in us and for others, and he promises us new and everlasting life in him in the life to come. Because Jesus is our Savior, we don't need to foolishly trust in false and functional saviors or lose hope, even in the worst seasons.
  3. As giver, Jesus gave himself for his bride. his comfort, safety, and well-being were not his highest priority. In humility, he set aside his rights and life in service to his bride, the church. Today, Jesus remains the same and continues to give lavishly of himself for our good.
  4. As sanctifier and cleanser, Jesus is patient with us, never gives up on us, and always seeks to make us more holy. Jesus is not sick of you, done wit you, or overwhelmed by you. he is sanctifying you, cleansing you, and has hope for you. He is not finished with you and will not be until you see him face to face as a friend.
  5. As nourisher and cherisher, Jesus loves you and the rest of his people enthusiastically, not begrudgingly or regrettably. And he continually reveals to us through Scripture the areas where he longs to help us grow and change. He does this not by standing back and making demands of us but rather lovingly placing his life in us through the Holy Spirit. (190-191)

For more:
Mark Driscoll on What Forgiveness Is
Mark Driscoll on What Forgiveness Is Note
Driscoll on What Forgiveness Is Not
"Death By Love" by Mark Driscoll & Gerry Breshears: A Review
Doctrine by Mark Driscoll
"Real Marriage" by Mark & Grace Driscoll
Religion Saves by Mark Driscoll
The Radical Reformation by Mark Driscoll
Vintage Jesus by Mark Driscoll 
"God's Hand in Our Suffering" by Mark Driscoll

All Around the Web - May 29, 2013



This is a real ad from Planned Parenthood.

HT: The Right Scoop


WORLD Magazine - Florida man charged with murder for tricking girlfriend into abortion |

Heartbreaking and treacherous are just two words being used to describe the latest abortion story out of Florida. 

According to federal authorities, 28-year-old John Andrew Welden tricked his pregnant 26-year-old girlfriend, Remee Lee, into taking a pill used to induce labor and cause an abortion. Lee’s baby died after she unknowingly took the medication.

Needless to say, the couple split up, and the woman is devastated, according to her attorney, who has filed a lawsuit in the state court on her behalf.

"Whenever a woman is robbed of her ability to give birth and have a child, I don't think there's any greater harm you can cause somebody," said Gil Sanchez. "She's devastated. She still can't believe this happened to her."


Credo Magazine - Which controversy in church history should Christians know about today and why? | This is a great article. If I had to pick from the options made available it would be on Augustine and Pelagianism.

Augustine and Pelagianism. This ancient debate is not simply an old one, but is a perennial one.  Every Christian in every generation has to work through this issue, or should.  It is in wrestling with the question of grace—and in thinking through these two traditions in particular—that one can understand the majesty and beauty of grace.  Also, in working through the Augustinian and Pelagian traditions one should make sure and grasp what Augustine had to say about the reality of grace within and during the Christian life (and not just concerning grace and the beginning of, or entry into, the Christian life), which I believe is as important as any contribution Augustine made.  For Augustine, God’s grace does not simply initiate and bring about saving faith.  Grace certainly does that.  But additionally, God’s grace is a grace which efficaciously moves us to seek God, to obey Him, and to persevere.


Joe Carter - 9 Things You Should Know About Human Cloning |

6. The primary moral objection to cloning for research is that it creates human life solely for the purpose of destroying it; using a human embryo merely as a means to an end. In order to justify the killing of these human beings for their "spare parts", we have to ignore the scientific understanding what makes a member of the human species and argue on the metaphysical definition of what constitutes personhood.' While it is true that many people oppose the cloning of human embryos for valid religious and ethical reasons, the issue is not divided along the typical left/right political spectrum. Even pro-choice advocates and others who hold secular and/or progressive political views find sufficient ethical concerns for opposing the procedure. Daniel Sulmasy, a professor of medicine and a bioethicist at the University of Chicago, told National Public Radio (NPR), "This is a case in which one is deliberately setting out to create a human being for the sole purpose of destroying that human being. I'm of the school that thinks that that's morally wrong no matter how much good could come of it."

7. Currently, the primary justification for therapeutic cloning is as a means of harvesting embryonic stem cells—a process that ends a human life—for research purposes. Despite years of media hype and billions of dollars dedicated to the venture, embryonic stem cell research (ESCR) has never produced any clinically proven therapies—and likely never will. As the Washington Post wrote earlier this week, "few experts think that production of stem cells through cloning is likely to be medically useful soon, or possibly ever." ESCR has been one of the most expensive boondoggles in biomedical history.

8. Cloning not only compounds the ethical concerns of ESCR but adds a significant number of other moral problems. This Machiavellian approach would be difficult to justify even if ESCR were to lead to miraculous cures. But research using harvested embryonic stem cells appears to be an unnecessarily speculative undertaking and a waste of money, life, and medical research. The use of adult stem cells, however, has none of the ethical problems and far fewer of the biomedical complications of ESCR. In fact, more than 70 types of therapies have been developed using adult stem cells.


The Blaze - ‘Twilight’s…First Gleaming?’: Watch Canadian Butcher ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ and Bravely Plow Ahead, Making Up Words |




Brian Howard - Are you still working on your Sermon Saturday Night? |

1. Set aside an hour on Friday to plan your schedule for the following week.
2.Calendar specific times for meetings that work for you.
3. Never agree on a Sunday morning to a meeting for the coming week.


Colin Cowherd on NFL Draft






Tuesday, May 28, 2013

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 5

Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 1 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 2 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 3
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 4  
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Prolegomena 5

Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 1
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 2 
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 3
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 4
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 5
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 6
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 7
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 8  
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 9
Christian Theology: Blogging Through Erickson - Bibliology 10

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 3 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 5 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 6
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 7
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 8
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 10
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 11
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 12
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 13
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 14
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 15
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 16
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 17
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 18
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 19
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Theology Proper 20

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 3
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 5 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 6
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 7
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 8
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 9
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 10
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 11
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 12
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 13
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 14
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 15
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Creation/Providence 16

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 3
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 5 
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Anthropology 6

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 3
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 5
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 6
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 7
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 8
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Hamartiology 9

"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 1
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 2
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 3
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 4
"Christian Theology": Blogging Through Erickson - Christology 5


In the conclusion of his chapter on the Deity of Christ, Millard Erickson offers a number of implications.

1. We can have real knowledge of God. Jesus said, "Anyone who has seen me has seen the father' (John 14:9). whereas the prophets came bearing a message from God, Jesus was God. If we would know what the love of God,the holiness of God, the power of god are like, we need only look at Christ.
2. Redemption is available to us. The death of Christ is sufficient for all sinners who have ever lived, for it was not merely a finite human, but an infinite God who died. he, the Life, the Giver and Sustainer of life, who did not have to die, died.
3. God and humanity have been reunited. It was not an angel or a human who came from God to the human race, but God himself crossed the chasm created by sin.
4. Worship of Christ is appropriate. He is not merely the highest of the creatures, but he is God in the same sense and to the same degree as the Father. he is as deserving of our praise, adoration and obedience as is the Father. (720)

Other implications and applications of the deity of Jesus could be given in addition to these, but one in particular is worth mentioning. In his book Christianity & Liberalism, J. Gresham Machen argued that if Christ is merely a man, then He is merely an example of faith. However, if Christ is God, then He is more than an example, but the object of our faith.

If JC is just the example of our faith, then He ought to be respected, but not worshiped.  But if JC is the object, then He must respond in repentance, belief, obedience, and submission to His Lordship. When Jesus, as the object of our faith, demands we leave everything, including father and mother, such a command is not optional. When He demands repentance and counting the cost, He expects perfect obedience. But if Jesus is merely an example, then we can take it or leave it.

Thus, as God, Jesus does not offer just one of many ways to live to greater enlightenment, but new life found solely in the God-Savior Himself. Jesus did not come to offer guidance, but regenerating salvation.


For more:
John Knox on the Threefold Office of Christ
John Knox on the Importance of the Ascension
The God Who Became Man: Millard Erickson on the Implications of the Humanity of Christ 
Alumni Academy Christology Lectures From Dr. Bruce Ware
"The Jesus We Missed" by Patrick Henry Reardon 

All Around the Web - May 28, 2013



You'll never guess how much this painting sold for.


HT: 22 Words


CNN - When Christians Become a "Hated Minority" |

When Peter Sprigg speaks publicly about his opposition to homosexuality, something odd often happens.

During his speeches, people raise their hands to challenge his assertions that the Bible condemns homosexuality, but no Christians speak out to defend him.
“But after it is over, they will come over to talk to me and whisper in my ear, ‘I agree with everything you said,’" says Sprigg, a spokesman for The Family Research Council, a powerful, conservative Christian lobbying group.

We’ve heard of the “down-low” gay person who keeps his or her sexual identity secret for fear of public scorn. But Sprigg and other evangelicals say changing attitudes toward homosexuality have created a new victim: closeted Christians who believe the Bible condemns homosexuality but will not say so publicly for fear of being labeled a hateful bigot.


WORLD Magazine - Campbellsville outcast |

To some observers, Jarvis Williams would seem to be the ideal tenure-track professor. In 2010 he won a teaching award from the Campbellsville University student government; in 2011 he received a university commendation for his work on racial reconciliation and theology; and in 2012 administrators promoted him to associate professor. Williams has been a prolific writer, publishing three books in three years. But suddenly this spring, Southern Baptist-affiliated Campbellsville told him that he should not apply for tenure, and that they would only offer him a terminal one-year contract for the 2013-14 school year. 

Williams’ dismissal has outraged a number of evangelical and Baptist leaders. Russell Moore, president-elect of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, told me that he is “very disturbed” by Williams’ case, as he considers Williams (who was unable to comment on this story) one of the only theological conservatives teaching at the school. Patrick Schreiner, a doctoral student at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (Williams’ alma mater) who first blogged about the case, asserts that, even as Campbellsville dismissed Williams, the school employs other “professors in the school of theology who reject biblical authority and biblical inerrancy.”



Christianity Today - 'The Office' Shows Even TV Romance Isn't Picture-Perfect |

In this regard, TV doesn't fare much better than movies. Series finales often end with a wedding, or the promise of one to come. But Season 9 of The Office offered a refreshing change of pace and a much fuller picture of marriage. Jim and Pam are a great match and they are truly committed to each other, but happiness hasn't come easily. Their marriage is tested by the pressures of career and family, and viewers were left to wonder if the relationship would collapse.


What makes the Halperts' struggle compelling is that it was inspired not by TV tropes, but real life. The actor who plays Jim, John Krasinski, watched his brother endure the marital strain of work-related travel and pitched the scenario to the show's creator, Greg Daniels. Consequently, Jim took a job in Philadelphia while Pam continued to work at Dunder Mifflin, and the two were long-distance for the majority of Season 9.


John Stonestreet - Gosnell and the Abortion License |

By far, the best reaction to the verdict came from Chuck Colson’s friend, Princeton Professor Robert George. Writing for First Things, George called Gosnell a “front man” and added that “the real trial has only just begun.” In that trial, “the defendant is the abortion license in America.”

Among the many offenses of the “abortion license in America” is its incoherence and arbitrariness. Gosnell faced the death penalty for actions which, if they had been performed weeks or even minutes earlier, might not have even been a criminal offense.

As George wrote, “Something as morally arbitrary as a human being’s location — his or her being in or out of the womb — cannot determine whether killing him or her is an unconscionable act of premeditated homicide or the exercise of a fundamental liberty.”

Yet that is precisely what the “abortion license” dictates. George asks, “If we are to condemn snipping the neck of a child delivered at, say, twenty-four or twenty-six weeks to kill him or her, how can we defend dismembering or poisoning a child in the womb at twenty-six, thirty, or even thirty-four weeks?”

The answer is, of course, we can’t, at least not with any intellectual or moral integrity.


Christianity Today - An Inside Look at Church Attenders Who Tithe the Most |

An examination of church attenders who regularly tithe reveals some interesting facts about their financial health.

For the first time, this year's State of the Plate report (co-sponsored by CT's sister Church Law and Tax Group) used five years' worth of data to examine the characteristics of "tithers": church members and attenders who "actively donate 10 percent or more of their income."


As it turns out, they tend to fall on the 'more' side: 77 percent of tithers reported giving between 11 and 20 percent of their income, and 70 percent donate based on their gross (not net) income. The majority (63 percent) started tithing 10 percent or more between childhood and their twenties.


CBS New York - Study: Handbags May Have More Bacteria Than A Toilet Seat |

Many ladies love their handbags and will spend a lot of money for the latest and greatest, but a new study says what is inside those bags may be covered in germs worse than what you’ll find in the bathroom.

As CBS 2′s Cindy Hsu reported Wednesday, the study said your purse may, in fact, have more bacteria than your average toilet seat.

Some people admit that the inside of the purses is less than orderly. Susan Ecker said hers is a disaster.

“You’ll find chocolate that’s fallen out of its wrapper and all sorts of things that are buried at the bottom,” she said.


Even a toothpick, loose mints and some crumbs were down there.

Monday, May 27, 2013

"May God bless the fallen & all those who serve": President Obama on Memorial Day 2013

Here is President Barack Obama's memorial day speech.




Thank you. (Applause.) Please be seated. Thank you very much. Good morning, everybody. I want to thank Secretary Chuck Hagel, not only for the introduction but, Chuck, for your lifetime of service -- from sergeant in the Army to Secretary of Defense, but always a man who carries with you the memory of friends and fallen heroes from Vietnam. We’re grateful to you.

I want to thank General Dempsey, Major General Linnington, Kathryn Condon, who has served Arlington with extraordinary dedication and grace and who will be leaving us, but we are so grateful for the work that she’s done; for Chaplain Brainerd, Secretary Shinseki, all our guests. And most of all, to members of our armed services and our veterans; to the families and friends of the fallen who we honor today; to Americans from all across the country who have come to pay your respects: I have to say it is always a great honor to spend this Memorial Day with you at this sacred place where we honor our fallen heroes -- those who we remember fondly in our memories, and those known only to God.

Beyond these quiet hills, across that special bridge, is a city of monuments dedicated to visionary leaders and singular moments in the life of our Republic. But it is here, on this hallowed ground, where we choose to build a monument to a constant thread in the American character -- the truth that our nation endures because it has always been home to men and women who are willing to give their all, and lay down their very lives, to preserve and protect this land that we love.

That character -- that selflessness -- beats in the hearts of the very first patriots who died for a democracy they had never known and would never see. It lived on in the men and women who fought to hold our union together, and in those who fought to defend it abroad -- from the beaches of Europe to the mountains and jungles of Asia. This year, as we mark the 60th anniversary of the end of fighting in Korea, we offer a special salute to all those who served and gave their lives in the Korean War. And over the last decade, we’ve seen the character of our country again -- in the nearly 7,000 Americans who have made the ultimate sacrifice on battlefields and city streets half a world away.

Last Memorial Day, I stood here and spoke about how, for the first time in nine years, Americans were no longer fighting and dying in Iraq. Today, a transition is underway in Afghanistan, and our troops are coming home. Fewer Americans are making the ultimate sacrifice in Afghanistan, and that’s progress for which we are profoundly grateful. And this time next year, we will mark the final Memorial Day of our war in Afghanistan.

And so, as I said last week, America stands at a crossroads. But even as we turn the page on a decade of conflict, even as we look forward, let us never forget, as we gather here today, that our nation is still at war.
It should be self-evident. And in generations past, it was. And during World War II, millions of Americans contributed to the war effort -- soldiers like my own grandfather; women like my grandmother, who worked the assembly lines. During the Vietnam War, just about everybody knew somebody -- a brother, a son, a friend -- who served in harm’s way.

Today, it’s different. Perhaps it’s a tribute to our remarkable all-volunteer force, made up of men and women who step forward to serve and do so with extraordinary skill and valor. Perhaps it’s a testament to our advanced technologies, which allow smaller numbers of troops to wield greater and greater power. But regardless of the reason, this truth cannot be ignored that today most Americans are not directly touched by war.

As a consequence, not all Americans may always see or fully grasp the depth of sacrifice, the profound costs that are made in our name -- right now, as we speak, every day. Our troops and our military families understand this, and they mention to me their concern about whether the country fully appreciates what’s happening. I think about a letter I received from a Naval officer, a reservist who had just returned from a deployment to Afghanistan. And he wrote me, “I’m concerned that our work in Afghanistan is fading from memory.” And he went on to ask that we do more to keep this conflict “alive and focused in the hearts and minds of our own people.”

And he’s right. As we gather here today, at this very moment, more than 60,000 of our fellow Americans still serve far from home in Afghanistan. They’re still going out on patrol, still living in spartan forward operating bases, still risking their lives to carry out their mission. And when they give their lives, they are still being laid to rest in cemeteries in the quiet corners across our country, including here in Arlington.

Captain Sara Cullen had a smile that could light up a room and a love of country that led her to West Point. And after graduation, Sara became a Black Hawk pilot -- and married a former Black Hawk pilot. She was just 27 years old when she and four other soldiers were killed in a helicopter crash during a training mission near Kandahar. This past April, Sara was laid to rest here, in Section 60. Today, Sara is remembered by her mother, Lynn, who says she is “proud of her daughter’s life, proud of her faith and proud of her service to our country.” (Applause.)

Staff Sergeant Frankie Phillips came from a military family and was as tough as they come. A combat medic, Frankie was on patrol in Afghanistan three weeks ago when his vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb. He was so humble that his parents never knew how many lives he had saved until soldiers started showing up at his funeral from thousands of miles away. And last week, Frankie was laid to rest just a few rows over from Sara.

Staff Sergeant Eric Christian was a born leader. A member of the Marine Corps Special Operations Command, Eric had served five tours of duty, but kept going back because he felt responsible for his teammates and was determined to finish the mission. On May 4th, Eric gave his life after escorting a high-ranking U.S. official to meet with Afghan leaders. Later, his family got a letter from a Marine who had served two tours with Eric. In it, the Marine wrote, “There were people who measured their success based on how many enemies they killed or how many missions they led to conquer a foe. Eric based his success on how many of his friends he brought home, and he brought home many -- including me.” Eric was laid to rest here at Arlington, just six days ago. (Applause.)

So today, we remember their service. Today, just steps from where these brave Americans lie in eternal peace, we declare, as a proud and grateful nation, that their sacrifice will never be forgotten. And just as we honor them, we hold their families close. Because for the parents who lose a child; for the husbands and wives who lose a partner; for the children who lose a parent, every loss is devastating. And for those of us who bear the solemn responsibility of sending these men and women into harm’s way, we know the consequences all too well. I feel it every time I meet a wounded warrior, every time I visit Walter Reed, and every time I grieve with a Gold Star family.

And that’s why, on this day, we remember our sacred obligation to those who laid down their lives so we could live ours: to finish the job these men and women started by keeping our promise to those who wear America’s uniform -- to give our troops the resources they need; to keep faith with our veterans and their families, now and always; to never stop searching for those who have gone missing or who are held as prisoners of war.

But on a more basic level, every American can do something even simpler. As we go about our daily lives, we must remember that our countrymen are still serving, still fighting, still putting their lives on the line for all of us.

Last fall, I received a letter from Candie Averette, of Charlotte, North Carolina. Both of her sons are Marines. Her oldest served two tours in Iraq. Her youngest was in Afghanistan at the time. He was, in her words, “100 percent devoted to his deployment and wouldn’t have had it any other way.”

Reading Candie’s letter, it was clear she was extraordinarily proud of the life her boys had chosen. But she also had a request on behalf of all the mothers just like her. She said, “Please don’t forget about my child and every other Marine and soldier over there who proudly choose to defend their country.”

A mother’s plea -- please don’t forget. On this Memorial Day, and every day, let us be true and meet that promise. Let it be our task, every single one of us, to honor the strength and the resolve and the love these brave Americans felt for each other and for our country. Let us never forget to always remember and to be worthy of the sacrifice they make in our name.

May God bless the fallen and all those who serve. And may God continue to bless the United States of America. (Applause.)


HT: Real Clear Politics

"Reformed Confessions of the 16th and 17th Centuries in English Translation: Volume 3, 1567-1599" by James T. Dennison: A Review

The Christian church has always been a professing church. Being that Christianity is built on Divine Revelation in both the Word of Scripture and in the Person of Christ, orthodoxy must be defined and limited. Thus from the beginning, the church has expressed its faith - its orthodoxy - through various confessions, creeds, and catechisms. By the time of the Protestant Reformation of the 16th Century, new confessions and creeds arose in abundance. The Reformers and their heirs were in protest against the doctrinal and practical abuses of the Roman Catholic Church. As a result, the 16th and 1th Century produced an abundance of confessions.

In recent years Dr. James T. Dennison has been translating and publishing in modern English the many confessions of the Reformation beginning in 1523. Volume one covers the years of 1523-1552. Volume two covers the years of 1552-1566. Volume three (titled, Reformed Confessions of the 16th and 17th Centuries in English Translation: Volume 3, 1567 1599), which dominates this review, cover the years of 1567-1599.

The book, volume three, follows the same pattern as its predecessors. The author's introduction to the series is found only in volume one and thus in volume three no introduction is given and the author immediately publishes the first of twenty-three confessions of faith. Each confession, however, is introduced by the editor giving its historic context, the reason for its publication, and what role it played.

The one that interests me the most regards the 1581 Craig's Catechism written by Scottish theologian and John Knox colleague John Craig (1512-1600). Though there are few modern updates of Craig's Catechism, Dennison has put published the best and his introduction to it and the necessary corrections made to it are excellent. The introduction to Craig's Catechism consists of two lengthy paragraphs. Here is the second:

Craig's catechism was a Scots staple until the Westminister Catechism (Larger and Shorter) were completed in 1647. Our text is based on that printed in A Short Sum of the Whole catechisme, Wherein the Question is Propounded and Answered in fewe Words, for the greater ease of the common people and Children (London: Printed by Thomas Creede for Thomas Man, 1608[?]). We have modernize some spelling and punctuation and inserted the proof-texts in the body of the catechism. We have attempted to make sense of these proof-texts and to correct them (were necessary), but admit that many of them remain a mystery. Nonetheless, where we have not been able to provide the obvious correction, we have inserted them as they are printed in the margins of the original. (544-545)

This is typical of Dennison's approach. He explains the confession's influence, the story behind it, and explains any changes made to the confession. To use Craig's Catechism as an example of editorial changes, consider the one on page 549. It reads:

Q. Was all Cain's [sic: read Adam's] posterity delivered and restored (Rom. 4:3; John 17:31).
A. No, but those who believed the promise.*


In this example, Dennison highlights and corrects the clear mistake of Craig and gives the reading which Craig intended. It was not the posterity of Cain that received the promise, but of Adam. This is typical throughout this great Reformation resource. The editor does more than compile old confessions of the Reformation, he goes through great trouble making them more accessible and readable. He careful seeks to balance publishing old confessions as original as possible and yet making any and necessary changes.

Overall, this ongoing series will continue to live on in scholarship in decades to come. Dennison is providing Reformation studies with an invaluable resource. History has almost forgotten many of these confessions and, thanks to Dennison and these volumes, they will continue to live. The Reformation changed the world and such works of theology ought to be preserved for generations to come. Dennison makes sure that that happens.



* Compare this to Horatio Bonar's publication of this same question and answer:


Q. How did Adam and his pofteritie receive the promife?
A. Onely through their owne lively Faith in Chrift

Likewise, compare T. F. Torrance's publication of this same question and answer:

Q. How did Adam and his posterity receive the promise?
A. Only through their own lively faith in Christ. (The School of Faith, 103)



For more on John Craig:An Introduction to the Life and Works of Scottish Reformer John Craig
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism: A New Translation - Introduction
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism: A New Translation - Chapter 1
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter 2
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter  3
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter 4.1
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter 4.2
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter 4.3
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter 5.1
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter 5.2
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter 6.1
A Short Summary of the Whole Catechism - Chapter 6.2 
"Scottish Theology" by T. F. Torrance: A Review


For more on Confessions:
"The Creedal Imperative" by Carl Trueman: A Review
"The Good News We Almost Forgot" by Kevin DeYoung
"The School of Faith" by Thomas F. Torrance: A Review
 


For more on the Reformation:
"The Reformation for Armchair Theologians" by Glenn S. Sunshine: A Review
The Theology of the Reformers  
The Unquenchable Flame  
"On the Necessity of Reforming the Church" by John Calvin
John Calvin:  A Heart for Devotion, Doctrine, & Doxology 
Christianity's Dangerous Idea
"Five Leading Reformers"     
 Was Calvin a Calvinist?  Helm Weighs In 
He Turned the Water Into Wine: MacArthur, Alcohol, & Christian Liberty
Theology Thursday | Calvin on the Redemptive Necessity of the Resurrection
Calvinist Baptists and the Many (False) Misconceptions
"Without the Gospel": A Gem From John Calvin
Calvin on God in Theology and the Christian Life
Calvin on Providence
Calvin on Treasures in Heaven
Calvin on Fasting
Calvin on Prayer: Why Bother?  

All Around the Web - May 27, 2013

Chad Owen Brand - Is Christianity Today the New Christian Century? |

Mark Galli of Christianity Today has just published an assessment of Rob Bell's theology. While he offers some critique, his evaluation is largely affirmative. Even the little aside comments in his analysis are actually kind of scary. In the opening paragraph he writes of Bell, “He believes the Bible is authoritative at some level–that is, he always tries to understand his life in light of his reading of the Bible.” Does that sound like the ringing endorsement of the authority of Scripture that evangelicals have traditionally affirmed? When commenting on whether Bell believes in divine judgment, that is, whether Bell is a universalist, Galli states, “He says people who abuse and exploit others and creation will not participate in the glorious restoration of heaven on earth.” I get the first part of that statement, but does the second part mean that if I don't recycle, that I will not participate in the resurrection to life in Bell's view?

At several points the article gets really dicey, but one in particular. Galli offers several quotes from Bell's new book, What We Talk Abut When We Talk About God, including this one: “So, when we talk about God, we're talking about our brushes with spirit, our awareness of the reverence humming within us, our sense of the nearness and farness, that which we know and that which is unknown” (page 91). Galli's comment? “Bell believes our knowledge of God is grounded not in doctrine, not in the Bible, the preached Word, the sacraments, our institutions, or even what Jesus revealed (all ways theologians ground our knowledge of God), but in our experiences and our intuitions–especially that sense that many have that there is a deeper reality in, with, and under this life. This is an appeal to general revelation, how God makes himself known naturally to the world.” In the course of the rest of the assessment, Galli indicates that he has no serious problem with such intuitive forms of spirituality, indicating that he wrote an endorsement for Margaret Feinberg's book, Wonderstruck.


Fox News - Duck Dynasty' CEO in the No Spin Zone |





Eric Metaxas - Be a Heroic Dad |

When was the last time you saw the media portray a strong father, maybe even a Christian dad, in a positive light? You’re far more likely to see dads shown as clueless, rigid, or the butt of constant jokes. The unspoken assumption in film, on TV, and in the culture, is that fathers are expendable. But statistics tell another story, and it’s no laughing matter.

According to the National Fatherhood Initiative: “Children in father-absent homes are almost four times more likely to be poor. Children born to single mothers show higher levels of aggressive behavior than children born to married mothers.

“Infant mortality rates are 1.8 times higher for infants of unmarried mothers than for married mothers.” Being raised without a dad “raises the risk of teen pregnancy, marrying with less than a high school degree, and forming a marriage where both partners have less than a high school degree. There is significantly more drug use among children who do not live with both their mother and father.”

Yikes!


Mental Floss - 15 TV Plot Points That Angered Viewers | I actually enjoyed the LOST series finale.

After all of the flashbacks, flashforwards, and flash-sideways, LOST fanatics were expecting a stellar ending that answered the many questions posed by the series. But the final episode didn't deliver all of the answers; even the ending isn't exactly clear, and there have been many interpretations as to what it meant. Fan reactions immediately after the finale were all over the map, and many are still annoyed.





Kevin DeYoung - If All You Have is a Hammer |

What do I have in mind? No one in particular but lots of things in general. The Christian who blames everything on fundamentalism and relates every story to their upbringing where they had to wear long skirts and watch Lawrence Welk. The feminist who sees the oppression of woman in every tweet. The conservative who can only sound the alarm of cultural declension. The Presbyterian who relates everything to the regulative principle. The church critic who sees every weakness as an expression of Moralistic Therapeutic Deism. The gospel-loving saint who smells legalism in every exhortation against vice and in every celebration of virtue. The philosopher who has concluded that every problem boils down to epistemology or the one and the many or whatever. The academic who thinks everything that ails the church finds its roots in whatever he wrote for his dissertation. The revisionist who is confident that the church is all out of sorts because of Greek thinking, Constantine, or Old Princeton. The wounded soul who can’t see past his own hurts or makes it her life mission to rage against the machine. The liberal who can’t stop talking about tolerance and dialogue. The Sunday school teacher who finds a reason in every class to beat on Charles Finney. The peacemaker who sees every conflict as a third way waiting to happen.

Some of us have one main thing we want to say to the world. If that one thing is true, clear, and winsome, praise God. Say it again and again. But we shouldn’t say that same thing in every situation. And we shouldn’t stop with that one true thing. The Bible is a big book and God has placed us in a big world. There is much to celebrate, much to affirm, much to correct, much to enjoy, much to lament, and much to proclaim. There are a lot of nails sticking up that could use some pounding. So pound away. Just realize they don’t all call for the same hammer.


An example of sportsmanship:

Saturday, May 25, 2013

The Existence of God: Eastwooding Dawkins

Atheist Richard Dawkins refuses to debate apologists William Lane Craig. But ever since the Clint Eastwood speech at the 2012 GOP Convention in which he spoke to an empty chair representing President Barack Obama, many have taken the gig and used it. That is was Craig did recently in articulating the various arguments for the existence of God. The empty chair represented Dawkins and Lane quotes the famous atheist's writings. It is a witty way to make your point. In the end, however, what follows is a helpful resource on the Christian arguments for the existence of God.

Does God exists? Here are the common reasons for saying yes.


Moral Argument For God




Teleological Argument For God:



Ontological Argument For God




Cosmological Argument For God



Here is the entire thing:



HT: Eugangelion


For more:
Collision:  An Important Documentary About Faith and Atheism  
Atheism and Moral Relativistic Parenting: Touchstone Takes on Harris
Harris on the Science of Morality:  Nice Try But No Cigar  
Natural Morality:  The Disconnect Between Darwinism and Morality
Freud's Wish Fulfillment: Why Atheism Can't Explain Atheism
The Atheist Debates
Atheism Is Not Great - The D'Souza and Hitchens Debate
John Lennox: The New Atheism and the Gospel  Blogizomai -D'Souza: Are Atheists Cultural Christians
Survival of the Moral: Can Man Be Moral Without God?
Re: Survival of the Moral: Can Man Be Moral Without God?
"Atheism Remix" by Dr. R. Albert Mohler, Jr.
"The Delusion of Disbelief" by David Aikman
"The End of Reason" by Ravi Zacharias
What's So Great About Christianity? by Dinesh D'Souza"Life After Death" by Dinesh D'Souza 
D'Souza - Letters To A Young Conservative  D'Souza - Ronald Reagan  Mohler:  An Argument Against Atheists - Dinesh D'Souza on Christianity
Justice and the Implications of Atheism: Doug Wilson Hits the Nail on Its Head