Thursday, August 29, 2013

All Around the Web - August 29, 2013

Joe Carter - 9 Things You Should Know About the March on Washington

1. The official title of the event was "March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom." It was organized by the "Big Six" leaders of the civil rights movement: A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young, Jr., Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., James Farmer, Roy Wilkins, and John Lewis. Bayard Rustin was chief organizer of the march.

4. On the National Mall, over 100 portable toilets were set up along with 16 first-aid stations.Eight 2,500-gallon water tanks were set up, which fed some 21 portable water fountains. Additionally, spouts were attached to fire hydrants so marchers would have access to drinking water. Volunteers prepared some 80,000 boxed lunches -- sold for 50 cents each -- consisting of a cheese sandwich, an apple, and a slice of cake.

5. Event organizer Bayard Rustin recruited 4,000 off-duty police officers and firemen to serve as event marshals, and coached them in the crowd control techniques he'd learned in India studying nonviolent political participation. The official law enforcement also included 5,000 police, National Guardsmen, and Army reservists. No marchers were arrested, though, and no incidents concerning marchers were reported.


Juan Williams - Songs of the Summer of 1963 . . . and 2013

Fifty years after the March on Washington, mystical memories of that seminal moment in the civil-rights era are less likely to focus on movement politics than on the great poetry and great music.
The emotional uplift of the monumental march is a universe of time away from today's degrading rap music—filled with the n-word, bitches and "hoes"—that confuses and depresses race relations in America now.

. . . 

Now, half a century after the lyrical promise of that inspiring music and poetry, there is the inescapable and heartbreaking contrast with the malignant, self-aggrandizing rap songs that define today's most popular music.

In Jay-Z's current hit, "Holy Grail," he sings about "psycho bitches" and uses the n-word seven times while bragging that he is "Living the life . . . Illest [n-word] alive." Another top rapper, Lil Wayne, released a song in the spring with an obscenity in the title, using the n-word repeatedly and depicting himself as abusing "hoes" and "bitches."
Similar examples abound in the rap-music world and have persisted for years with scarcely any complaint from today's civil-rights leaders. Their failure to denounce these lyrics for the damage they do to poor and minority families—words celebrating tattooed thugs and sexually indiscriminate women as icons of "keeping it real"—is a sad reminder of how long it has been since the world heard the sweet music of the March on Washington.


Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission - VIDEO: Russell Moore on chaplaincy and religious liberty




John Stonestreet - I Have a Dream

This is no minor point for Murray. He tells the story of one of his mentors, Chuck Johnston, who was a teacher in a segregated Atlanta school and attended the King speech in 1963—not to hear King, but to listen to singers Peter, Paul and Mary. But when Johnston got home, it was King’s words that were ringing in his ears: “I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.”

Murray writes, “This proposition stirred the heart of the Georgia native,” who was “the great-grandson of a former Mississippi slave owner” and “worked hard to bring about racial reconciliation in the schools he led.” Johnston eventually became executive director of the Atlanta Youth Academy, where he “shepherded the graduation of nine eighth-grade classes by his retirement in 2012.” Not a single student dropped out of high school, and many went on to attend college, Murray writes.

“Instead of putting God Almighty to the side,” as the memorial to King does, “Chuck Johnston placed him at the center.”

Now that the “drum major” quote has been blasted off, Murray recommends replacing it with a line from the “I Have a Dream” speech—one that affected not only Chuck Johnston, but hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions of others: “I have a dream...when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, ‘Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!’”

If you have children who are learning about the “I Have a Dream” speech today, make sure they understand what motivated Martin Luther King, Jr. It was his faith in the God who authored justice. Because of this, as King reminded us fifty years ago today, when it comes to civil rights, we should not be satisfied with America’s progress until “justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”


Washington Post - Conservative Christianity and the transgender question

Ultimately, the transgender question is about more than just sex. It’s about what it means to be human.

Poet Wendell Berry responded to techno-utopian scientism with the observation that civilization must decide whether we see persons as creatures or as machines. If we are creatures, he argued, then we have purpose and meaning, but also limits. If we see ourselves, and the world around us, as a machine, then we believe the Faustian myth of our own limitless power to recreate ourselves.
This is, it seems to me, the question at the heart of the transgender controversy. Are we created, as both the Hebrew Scriptures and Jesus put it, “male and female,” from the beginning or are these categories arbitrary and self-willed? Do our bodies, and our sexes, represent something of who we were designed to be, and thus impose limits on our ability to recreate ourselves?

Laws such as those in California will quickly test the boundaries of society’s tolerance for a psychological and individualistic definition of gender. There are reasons, after all, why societies put boys and girls in different bathrooms, men and women on different sports teams.  When gender identity is severed from biological sex, where does one’s self-designation end, and who will be harmed in the process?


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