Tuesday, February 11, 2014

All Around the Web - February 11, 2014




HT: Everyday Theology


The Gospel Coalition - Dear Donald Miller |
Your recent blog post, "I Don't Worship God by Singing. I Connect With Him Elsewhere.," reminded me of all this background. In addition to saying you "don't connect with God by singing," you also say "I don't learn much about God hearing a sermon" since "a traditional lecture is not for everybody." And you admit that you don't attend church often since "church is all around us."
The worldview and spirituality here resembles what I found in Blue Like Jazz. But now we're not talking about a piece of art. We're talking about how a Christian chooses to live. And, as I said, the path I've taken from those early days of angst and displacement, neither at home in the world nor in the American evangelical church, has turned in a very different direction. Instead of moving away from the traditional forms of institutional Christianity, I've moved toward them. My way out was deeper in.

I'm now an elder in a church with hour-long sermons, several long prayers, lots of singing, membership classes and interviews and meetings. We talk about repentance, practice church discipline, and use phrases like "submitting to the elders." In fact, Don, it gets worse. I've written about these things. I've advocated for them. I've drunk the Kool-Aid and then filled a tray of Dixie cups to hand out.

No, we must not mistake these structures for authentic Christian living and love. But I do believe they are both the food that gives life to the body, as well as the skeleton that holds the organs and muscles in place. And I believe they are biblical, by which I mean prescriptive for all Christians in all times and places, albeit with circumstantial adjustments.

Kevin DeYoung - How Many Motivations Are There for Godliness?
I see at least twenty. In the three chapters of 2 Peter alone.
1.    We pursue holiness so that we might become partakers of the divine nature (2 Pet. 1:4).
2.    We make every effort to grow in godliness because God has already set us free from the corruption that is in the world because of sinful desire (2 Pet. 1:4).
3.    We grow in grace so we will not be ineffective and unfruitful  in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ (2 Pet. 1:8).
4.    We pursue Christlike character so we will not be blind, having forgotten that we were cleansed from our former sins (2 Pet. 1:9).
5.    We work hard at holiness in order to make our calling and election sure, so that we will not fall (2 Pet. 1:10).
6.    We practice these godly qualities so there will be richly provided for us an entrance into the eternal kingdom (2 Pet. 1:11).
7.    We pursue godliness because Jesus is coming back again in great power, and we know this to be true because of the glory revealed on the Mount of Transfiguration and because of the prophecy of Scripture (2 Pet. 1:16-21).
8.    We walk in obedience to Christ because those who wander into sensuality are condemned and will be destroyed (2 Pet. 2:3).

Ligonier - Ask R.C. Live: January 2014


Ask R.C. Live: January 2014 from Ligonier Ministries on Vimeo.


Biblemesh - 10 Reasons to Know a Little Bit of Church History
1. Church history confirms the promises of Scripture.
2. Church history comforts believers in their struggles.
3. Church history broadens our choice of devotional literature.
4. Church history helps Christians counter heresies and cults.
5. Church history helps believers interpret the Bible.
6. Church history bolsters faith.
7. Church history provides terms to use in describing difficult doctrines.
8. Church history frees us from the illusion that modern, secular psychology is the only solution for emotional and behavioral problems.
9. Church history contains cautionary tales to remind us that Christians can dishonor their Lord.
10. Church history provides believers with a spiritual genealogy.

The WeekHow did Americans manage to lose $119 billion gambling last year?
The gambling industry around the world is huge, but the biggest market is the United States, where gamblers lost a staggering $119 billion in 2013:

That's a crazy amount of money; more money than Bill Gates has (with $72 billion) or Warren Buffett (with $58 billion), and only $11 billion less than the two men put together.

What intrigues me is the question of why so many people gamble. After all, everyone knows that the odds are stacked against gamblers, whether they're betting on slot machines, horse racing, football, roulette, bingo, or lotteries. Even the games where it is possible for a highly skilled player to consistently make money — blackjack and poker — are big losers for the vast majority of players. 
And why do some players — problem gamblers, around 1.8 percent of the population — end up losing vast amounts of money, going into debt, and sometimes even losing their families and homes?
 
Different individuals gamble for a mixture of different reasons.

Center for Bioethics and Culture - Breeders: A Subclass of Women? | This looks interesting and is something that Christians must address more.

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