Tuesday, February 18, 2014

All Around the Web - February 18, 2014

Jason Helopoulos - Does Calvinism Kill Missions? | I came across this article recently and I'm sure you have an idea what I Googled to find it.
One doesn’t have to be a thorough going Calvinist to be struck by the impact of Calvinism upon missions.
  • John Calvin: Calvin sent missionaries from Geneva into France and as far away as Brazil. Most of these young men sent to France died a martyr’s death, but the church of Geneva continued to send them.
  • John Eliot: A missionary sent to the American Indians in the 1600′s. He is believed to be the first missionary among this people group. As many have said, if William Carey is the father of the modern mission’s movement, then John Eliot is its grandfather.
  • David Brainerd: A missionary to the American Indians in the 1700′s. Many historians believe that he has sent more individuals into the mission field than any other person in the history of the church via his diary, An Account of the Life of the Late Reverend David Brainerd.
  • Theodorus Frelinghuysen: The great evangelist and preacher, who set the stage for the First Great Awakening in the middle colonies.
  • Jonathan Edwards: The great theologian, writer, and preacher of the First Great Awakening. He was also a missionary to the Indians.
  • George Whitfield: The great voice and preacher of the First Great Awakening. He journeyed across the Atlantic Ocean thirteen times and scholars believe he preached over 18,000 sermons.
  • William Tennent: He founded the Log College, which later became Princeton University. This college trained pastors and provided many of the revivalist preachers of the First Great Awakening.
  • Samuel Davies: The famous President of the College of New Jersey (Princeton University), preacher of the First Great Awakening, and evangelist to the slaves of Virginia. It is believed that hundreds of slaves came to saving faith through his evangelism efforts.
  • William Carey: He is the famous missionary to India and is considered the father of the modern mission’s movement.
  • Robert Moffat: The first missionary to reach the interior of Africa with the Gospel. He translated the entire Bible and Pilgrim’s Progess into Setswana.
  • David Livingstone: Arguably, the most famous missionary to the continent of Africa.
  • Robert Morrison: The first Protestant missionary to China and the first to translate the Bible into Chinese.
  • Peter Parker: An American physician and missionary to China who first introduced Western medical techniques to the Chinese. He also served as the president of the Medical Missionary Society of China.
  • Adoniram Judson: The famous missionary to Burma, translated the Bible into Burmese, and established multiple Baptist Churches in Burma. His mission work led many to enter the mission field and was foundational for forming the first Baptist association in America.
  • Charles Simeon: The vicar of Holy Trinity Church and the founding figure of the Church Missionary Society. This organization was instrumental in leading many students to the mission field. The Society itself has sent more than 9,000 missionaries into the world.
  • Henry Martyn: The renowned missionary to India and Persia. He preached in the face of opposition and translated the New Testament into a number of languages.
  • Samuel Zwemer: He is affectionately known as “The Apostle to Islam.” His legacy includes efforts in Bahrain, Arabia, Egypt, and Asia Minor. His writing was used by the Lord to encourage and mobilize an entire generation of missionaries to labor in Islamic countries.
  • John Stott: Scholar, preacher, pastor, and evangelist of the twentieth century. He was one of the principle authors and the influential leader in establishing the Lausanne Covenant, which promoted world-wide evangelism.
  • Francis Schaeffer: Pastor and found of L’Abri, which has been used by the Lord to draw many to saving faith as they intellectually wrestled with the tenants of Christianity.
  • D. James Kennedy: The founder of Evangelism Explosion, which many believe is the most widely used evangelistic training curriculum in church history.
  • John Piper: Pastor, writer, and theologian, who has been used by the Lord to define missions and send many young people into the mission field.

Resurgence - 10 Bad Reasons to Be a Pastor
1. You like spending time with other Christians
2. You like to study your Bible
3. You like speaking in public
4. You like introducing non-Christians to Jesus
5. You want to be more devoted to Jesus
6. You want to spend fewer hours working
7. You are looking for a more stable career
8. You are tired of conflict
9. You want others to respect you
10. You want to make a difference

Gospel Coalition - The Grueling Glory of Pastoral Ministry




Joe Carter - 9 Things You Should Know About Marriage in America
1. The average ages of people when they first marry (as of 2010) was 28.9 for men and 2010 for 26.9 women.

2. The marriage rate in the U.S. is currently 31.01, the lowest it's been in over a century, according to the National Center for Family and Marriage Center at Bowling Green State University. That equals roughly 31 marriages per 1,000 unmarried women. In 1920, the marriage rate reached its peak at 92.3. Since 1970, the marriage rate has declined by almost 60 percent. In real terms, the total number of marriages fell from 2.45 million in 1990 to 2.11 million in 2010.

3. Most people now live together before they marry for the first time. An even higher percentage of divorced persons who subsequently remarry live together first. And a growing number of persons, both young and old, are living together with no plans to marry eventually.

4. Unmarried cohabitation—the status of couples who are sexual partners, not married to each other, and sharing a household—is particularly common among the young. It is estimated that about a quarter of unmarried women age 25 to 39 are currently living with a partner and an additional quarter have lived with a partner at some time in the past. More than 60 percent of first marriages are now preceded by living together, compared to virtually none fifty years ago.

BuzzFeed - 32 Things You Always Believed That Simply Aren’t True
4. Human blood is never actually colored blue in your body.
7. The color orange is named after the fruit, not the other way around.
9. The story about NASA developing a space pen whilst the Russians used a pencil is untrue. NASA also used pencils.

10. It’s never actually stated that the forbidden fruit mentioned in the Bible is an apple. Some claim that it was more likely a fig or pomegranate.
11. Humans have more than five senses. The actual number ranges from 9 to over 20.

14. Not everyone in Columbus’ time thought the world was flat.
18. It doesn’t take seven years to digest chewing gum. It’s actually not digestible, and just passes right through your system.
 
I always thought the creepiest crime was to enter someone's house and only rearrange the furniture. But now with smart phones, this might be creepier.

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